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  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path New Edition - wholly rewalked and update 2018 The 80 mile/125km long North Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path between Chester and Bangor runs alongside the broad Dee Estuary and traditional seaside towns past Conwy Castle, the Great Orme, Penmaenmawr and Conwy Mountain to the university town of Bangor on the Menai Strait. This Official Guide splits the route into 8 convenient day sections, each of about 9-12 miles / 14-20 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • When it comes to hill walking, walks with views are much more fun than those without. They’re the walkers reward: the potential grandeur of the vista or panorama from just over the next incline or the atop the next crag is the incentive that draws on weary legs to summits. With lakes, rivers, forests, woodland, rolling countryside and craggy fells all crammed into such a compact geographical area, it’s no surprise that the Lake District is full of such stunning visual rewards, with unique and beautiful views around every corner.
  • Cheshire’s Sandstone Trail is probably the most popular middle-distance walk in Northwest England. The Trail runs for 55 kilometres/34 miles along Cheshire’s beautiful and varied central sandstone ridge between Frodsham and Whitchurch, just over the border in Shropshire. This cleverly structured and well designed guidebook gives walkers the ten best short circular walks along the length of the Sandstone Trail in a handy, pocketable format.
  • The Official Guide to the Isle of Anglesey/Ynys Mon Coastal Path New Edition - rewalked and wholly updated 2018 The route is described in a clockwise direction, starting and finishing at Holyhead. The 130 mile/210km long Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path passes through some of the grandest coastal scenery in Wales — wide sandy bays and estuaries, intimate coves, dramatic cliffs and rocky islets, sand dunes and forests—much of it designated ‘An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). This Official Guide has been designed to provide all the information needed to plan and walk the coastal path and includes:
    • Information on accommodation, public transport, seasonal closures and tidal restrictions
    • Twelve day-walk chapter sections with detailed route descriptions and full Ordnance Survey mapping
    • Fascinating notes on points of interest
  • The hills and mountains of Snowdonia will captivate any lover of wild mountain scenery, with around 100 summits above 2,000 feet (approximately 610 metres) and fourteen exceeding 3,000 feet (914 metres). The ten classic walks in this great little guide have been chosen to give a variety of routes, spread across the entire National Park, with most of the main hill groups represented. For each mountain the most scenic route has been chosen and where possible these are well-established, classic paths, easy to follow, with good access and official parking. Enjoy Snowdonia.
  • The ten routes outlined in this attractive pocket size book are amongst the very best challenging routes on the mountains of Snowdonia. Snowdonia's mountain ridges can be every bit as dramatic as the summits they connect. Some are well known classics like the Snowdon Horseshoe or Nantlle Ridge, while others are surprisingly well kept secrets like the Llech Du Spur, Gyrn Lâs Ridge or the ridges of the northern Glyderau. Created as a companion volume to the best selling 'Top 10 Mountain Walks', these little books will show you the very best that Snowdonia has to offer.
  • This attractive book explores twenty of the best low level circular walks in northern Snowdonia. Walking in Northern Snowdonia is dedicated to the northern half of the National Park, bounded by the Conwy Valley to the east, Glyn Lledr and the Vale of Ffestiniog to the south and Cwm Pennant to the west. Twenty circular walks are described, ranging in length from 4½ to 9 miles, which explore the woods, valleys and lower hillsides of this unique and beautiful area.
  • This lovely pocket size book describes the ten best short circular walks in the Yorkshire Dales' dales and valleys. The focus in the Yorkshire Dales tends to be on a trio of much-loved valleys: Swaledale, Wensleydale and Wharfedale. Yet, broadening the gaze, one finds other equally spellbinding valleys, such as Airedale, Ribblesdale, the Rawthey and Dentdale. To the north, the bounding valleys of the Eden and Lune stretch the beauty of the National Park into wider horizons of pastoral serenity. Here are walks for quiet enjoyment and seasonal beauty, where nature still reigns amid traditional patterns of farming practice. Solid stone barns and field walls characterise the dale bottoms; and the flora of the dales is wonderfully diverse: many a meadow retains its native herbal mix — yielding a delightful aroma at haytime.
  • This attractive pocket size book features the ten finest short circular walks on the fells and moors of the Yorkshire Dales. The term ‘fell’ derives from the Norse settlers and was applied here to areas of upland pasture. While the Lake District is defined by its soaring ridges, the Dales, as their name implies, are an intricate pattern of valleys set in a muted moorland landscape. Yet great hills exist — to enthral and enthuse even the most ardent hillgoer. There is no better way of grasping the scale, beauty and extent of the Yorkshire Dales than from this fabulous compact of high fell tops. Each rooted in a dale, each dignified with unique prospects, all meriting walking as a richly rewarding company of hills.
  • This pocket size book explores the ten best short circular waterside walks in the Peak District. Some follow lovely stretches of rivers; others explore the northern reservoirs. Several major rivers originate in the Peak, fed by countless springs, brooks and streams that have cut deep cloughs and gorges through the grit and limestone. Many powered the early industrialisation of the area while the valleys often served as conduits for trans-Pennine trade. Other dales, too steep or narrow for settlement or farming, or whose streams found subterranean courses, were ignored and today provide valuable wildlife habitats. And although the region has no significant natural lakes, reservoirs abound and are now largely naturalised within the landscape.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten best pubs in the Peak District. Ever since rambling became a recognised pastime, country pubs have been magnets for walkers. Whether a lunch-time stop along the way or a final destination for the day, the promise of a thirst-quenching pint or a hearty meal are, for many, an integral part of the day. Many of Peakland’s inns have their origins in serving the jaggers and stockmen who travelled the lonely upland routes. Today, they serve not only the locals but also the growing influx of recreational visitors. Long live the Peak District pub.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Carmarthen Bay and Gower section of the Wales Coast Path runs for 120 miles/193 kilometres between Amroth, on the eastern edge of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, to Swansea, on the landward side of the Gower Peninsula. This Official Guide splits the route into 12 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path and includes: An overview of Carmarthen Bay and Gower with dedicated history and wildlife sections Twelve day-walk sections with detailed route descriptions and full, enhanced Ordnance Survey mapping Distance charts, section overviews, background information and interpretation of places of interest Stunning professional photographs throughout Information on accommodation, public transport, local information, weather, and tidal links.