South Wales

/South Wales
  • This lovely little book explores the ten best short circular walks along the southern part of the Pembrokeshire coast — itself part of the Wales Coast Path. The Pembrokeshire coast alters subtly from north to south. The southern rocks are far younger and the coast tends to be south-facing, too, creating a gentler hinterland. This influenced historical development and culture, for although the Norman advance extended throughout Pembrokeshire, settlement focused on the more fertile southern corner. It became known as ‘Little England’, with English rather than Welsh spoken, a tradition reflected in place names. Before reliable roads, trade and prosperity favoured the coast, and because the railways came late here, Pembrokeshire was largely ignored by the Industrial Revolution. Unspoiled and breathtakingly scenic, the coast is captivating every step of the way.
  • This photogenic book will take you on ten short circular walks along the northern part of the Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path. Pembrokeshire’s north coast has a rugged and remote quality, reflecting the wildness of the hills that rise behind. It was largely ignored during the Norman colonisation and even today beyond St Dogmael’s there are only a handful of coastal communities. Yet burial cairns, promontory forts and a pre-historic trackway across the Preseli Hills indicate widespread prehistoric settlement, and it was an important focus during the spread of Celtic Christianity. Fishing, farming and stock grazing were traditional ways of life, but the Industrial Revolution briefly opened coastal quarrying and the railway made Fishguard an important Irish port. Today, it is a relative backwater but the coast has an untamed beauty, its flowers, birds, seals and porpoises making it a truly special place.
  • This handy, pocket size book will take you on the ten best short circular walks along the Carmarthen Bay and Gower stretch of the Wales Coast Path. Carmarthen Bay embraces an area of Welsh coast stretching from south Pembrokeshire to the Gower Peninsula. Long, sandy beaches and wide, silty estuaries dominate much of the bay, though there are also high cliffs and rocky coves in places. The Gower Peninsula, at the eastern end of the bay, is a small but priceless gem. Britain’s first official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), the peninsula contains an astonishing variety of landscapes: dunes, marshland, high cliffs, windswept downs, wooded valleys, picturesque villages and glorious sandy beaches — all linked by a superb footpath network.
  • Understanding Welsh Place Names
    Puzzled by Welsh place names but want to know what they mean and how to say them? This fascinating, easy-to-use guide means non-Welsh speakers can now easily translate and understand place names all over Wales — on the map, on road signs, and out in the countryside. Armed with this insider knowledge, you’ll discover there’s a whole exciting new dimension to the Welsh landscape. In fact, Wales will never be quite the same again ….
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 186 mile/300km long Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path runs through some of Wales’ most varied and dramatic coastal scenery — high, rugged cliffs and long sandy bays, Pembroke Castle, St David’s cathedral and St Govan’s remote cliff-wrapped chapel, with several large offshore islands. Pembrokeshire is also Britain’s only coastal National Park. This Official Guide splits the route into 14 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Carmarthen Bay and Gower section of the Wales Coast Path runs for 120 miles/193 kilometres between Amroth, on the eastern edge of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, to Swansea, on the landward side of the Gower Peninsula. This Official Guide splits the route into 12 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path and includes: An overview of Carmarthen Bay and Gower with dedicated history and wildlife sections Twelve day-walk sections with detailed route descriptions and full, enhanced Ordnance Survey mapping Distance charts, section overviews, background information and interpretation of places of interest Stunning professional photographs throughout Information on accommodation, public transport, local information, weather, and tidal links.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The past two centuries have wrought more change on South Wales than any other section of the country’s coast. Until the end of the 18th century, Swansea, Barry and even Cardiff were just small ports, though their ships traded far and wide. The industry of iron and coal changed things forever but most of the coast and its immediate hinterland were left unspoiled and elsewhere, nature has reclaimed some of what was taken. The coast is one of extreme contrasts, ranging from great dune systems through sheer cliffs to miles of coastal saltmarsh. Nowhere is far from a delightful stretch overlooking the sea, with fine views, nature and heritage all around.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 115 mile/185km long South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path runs through unexpectedly varied and dramatic coastal scenery. Along the way are four National Nature Reserves and some 14 miles of designated Heritage Coast, while the deserted salt marshes and mudflats bordering the later stages of the route alongside the mouth of the River Severn are a bird-watchers' paradise. This Official Guide splits the route into nine achievable day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic pubs and inns in Pembrokeshire, in South Wales. Ever since rambling became a recognised pastime, country pubs have been magnets for walkers. Whether a lunchtime stop along the way or a final destination for the day, the promise of a thirst-quenching pint, bar snack or a hearty meal is for many, an integral part of the day. Many of Pembrokeshire's coastal inns have origins in serving seafarers, while those inland lay beside routes to and from the coast or beside old droves along which livestock were herded to market. Today, all have a fine tradition of serving visitors who come for no other purpose than to enjoy the magnificent countryside. Those chosen here have long established reputations for their food or ale and have an individual quirkiness worth seeking out.
  • Pembrokeshire’s Café Culture is booming and it’s not the big chains leading the way. Gone are the steamy fugs, greasy-spoon menus and chipped mugs; instead, there’s no shortage of bright and friendly venues serving speciality coffees and teas, home-made baking, and wonderful snacks and meals that capitalise on the best of local produce and culinary talent. Very often there’re take-away options too and sometimes interesting wines or Welsh-brewed beers and ciders. Many are open all day from breakfast and morning coffee to afternoon tea, with some venues running into the evening too with live music, poetry or storytelling. They’re great places to rest or meet up with friends, too; so go for a walk and see what you can find — you’ll not be disappointed.