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  • This lovely little book will take you on short circular walks to some of the Yorkshire Dales' most distinctive pubs and inns. The pubs of the Yorkshire Dales reflect both the area and the local people: occasionally gritty and challenging, sometimes uncompromising but essentially hugely welcoming and full of character. Some of England’s best watering holes stand here beside country lanes and village greens as they have for centuries past, gathering and exuding that unique amalgam which defines a pub. The flagged floors, the winter fires, the lamplight pooling onto lanes through bottle-glass windows, the quirky bars; that happy jigsaw of time and place which makes rambling to and between them one of life’s great pleasures.
  • This Official Guide to the Llŷn Peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path contains everything local and long-distance walkers need. The Llŷn offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. Its distinctive landscape is characterised by traditional farms, compact villages and volcanic hills encircled by the ever-present sea. Along the way, you'll pass Iron Age hillforts, pilgrims' churches, medieval castles, a hidden valley, a pub on the beach, tiny coves, sandy bays and Bardsey island balanced at the tip of this ancient 'Land's End of Wales'. Keep an eye out, too, for seabirds, wild goats, choughs, seals, dolphins, wildflowers and butterflies. The Llŷn coast path really is a walkers' paradise.  
  • This lovely little book will take you on ten short circular walks through the finest woods and forests in the Lake District People seem to be drawn to trees, be they part of a landscape that has existed for centuries or planted in more modern times. There is something special about being in among their sturdy trunks, surrounded by a rich understorey with the sunlight piercing the canopy high above. In the Lake District, there is a huge variety of woodland — and no matter what their origins, what tree types grow there or how they have been managed, that extraordinary atmosphere never fails to nourish the soul.
  •  WINNER OF TGO’s ‘BEST GUIDEBOOK’ AWARD 2013 This award-winning book of short circular walks explores the ten most amazing historic sites in the Lake District. It may not seem obvious at first, but the rich human heritage of the area we now call the Lake District is evident all around us as we walk the fells and dales. From the enigmatic monuments built by prehistoric peoples to the industrial scars left in more modern times, centuries of human habitation have left their mark on this landscape. Keep your eyes and your imagination open, and you will come to realise that every step you take is a step through time. A worthy winner.
  • Circular Walks in Wirral will take you to some of Wirral’s most peaceful and scenic corners, and outlines 17 walks exploring Wirral's finest countryside spread throughout the peninsula.
  • The 30 short circular walks in this book have been written with the non-serious walker in mind, varying in length from just 1 to 4¾ miles (1.5km to 7.5km). Each walk has something of interest to discover — you will visit the site of an ancient port now completely dried out and over a mile inland; a seafront with neither sand nor sea; a wild, wooded river valley in the heart of industrial Merseyside and a lowland heath with wide views to the Welsh hills
  • New, revised edition of the official guide to Cheshire’s Sandstone Trail – probably the most popular middle-distance walk in Northwest England. The Trail runs for 55 kilometres/34 miles along Cheshire’s beautiful and varied central sandstone ridge between Frodsham, on the Mersey Estuary in the north, and Whitchurch, just over the border in Shropshire, in the south. Along the way you'll pass two castles, some amazing views, black-and-white country pubs, a vast ancient forest, canals and pretty rural villages. Plus plenty of wildlife. What more could you want? Compiled and tested by seasoned walkers and local experts, this comprehensive, full colour guide is the perfect companion for weekend strollers and dedicated long-distance walkers alike.
  • This lovely, pocket size book offers the ten best short circular walks to upland moors and tors across the Peak District. The uplands of the Peak bear the characteristics of hills rather than mountains: high, undulating plateaux dissected by deep, meandering valleys. Yet there is little uniformity; the seemingly remote moorland of the Kinder plateau is in sharp contrast to the gentler and lower upland heaths found farther south. These landscapes change subtly with the seasons and, for those who care to look, are rich in wildlife. There are birds, hares, and foxes; and in summer, adders and lizards bask in the sun while butterflies dance in the remotest places.
  • This attractive pocket size book gives you the ten very best dale and valley walks in the Peak District. The White Peak is known for dramatic limestone gorges: convoluted pathways carved into its heart, where rearing pinnacles, dark caves and thundering rivers struck awe into seventeenth-century travellers. Still captivating today, they harbour rich woodland, wildflower meadows and disappearing and resurgent streams, one of the area’s strangest curiosities. Delightful Dovedale, once the haunt of the renowned anglers Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton, contrasts with Cave Dale, a gaunt, dry passage below Castleton’s Norman stronghold. But the Dark Peak has attractive valleys too, and different again is the Dane Valley, which cuts onto the Cheshire Plain from the gritstone moors.
  • This handy little guide book gives you the ten very best short circular walks along the Llŷn peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path The Llŷn pushes 30 miles into the Irish Sea, tipped by the holy isle of Bardsey, or Ynys Enlli ­­— ‘the island of 20,000 saints’. This remote and unspoilt landscape is characterised by traditional farms and compact villages, punctuated by volcanic hills. Its relative isolation has made it a haven for the Welsh language and culture. Sea cliffs, offshore rocks and intimate coves dominate the northern coast, while the gentler southern coast promises sandy beaches and holiday towns like Abersoch and Pwllheli. But for sheer beauty, tranquillity and wildlife, the Llŷn is hard to beat.
  •   This lovely little book contains the ten best short circular walks along the north part of the Cardigan Bay section of the Wales Coast Path Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey island on the tip of Lleyn, in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire, in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties, Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The striking northern section between Porthmadog and Borth is as varied as it is beautiful. Characterised by vast beaches and rugged cliffs, the coast offers superb walking with ever-changing views and a wealth of wildlife.
  • This pretty little book gives you short circular walks to the most spectacular waterfalls in the Yorkshire Dales. Geology and the way it shapes the land have created a countryside tailor-made for the development of waterfalls. The gritstone fells and moors gather copious rainfall, which they shed along countless becks and rivers that erode the rock into twisting gills and valleys. Where localised geological conditions bring together the grits and limestones, differential erosion creates bands of resistant rocks over which the becks plunge as hidden cataracts and waterfalls, often called forces in the Yorkshire Dales. Each has its own unique form and atmosphere to discover and explore.