• by Dennis Kelsall This superbly-written and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to the very best stretches of coast, pubs, tea shops, and viewpoints that the beautiful Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales, has to offer. Defining the south-westernmost tip of Wales, Pembrokeshire’s coastline is arguably the most beautiful and varied in the British Isles. Virtually all of it lies within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. Relative isolation has left it largely untouched by modern development and most of its length is a wild frontier where the endless confrontation between sea and land is played out. Long stretches of coast face the fury of Atlantic storms and weakness and faults in the high cliffs are eroded into caves, coves and inlets. However, the harder rock, some of which is 700 million years old, resists the onslaught and stands out in rugged promontories and headlands. Elsewhere, sheltered landings and harbours, fine beaches and secluded bays reveal other aspects of this glorious landscape. In spring and summer the cliff tops break out in the pink, blue, white and yellow of countless flowers and sea crags are alive with nesting birds, while some of Britain’s largest seal populations arrive in autumn to give birth. It was this wild beauty that prompted the establishment of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park in 1952. Despite being one of the UK’s smaller National Parks, it embraces a third of the county including all the offshore islands, the Daugleddau estuary, and the Preseli Hills. The Park is also home to the popular Pembrokeshire Coast Path — now part of the larger Wales Coast Path.  Discover dramatic coastlines at St Davids Head and Strumble Head, Manorbier and Tenby. Climb to lofty coastal panoramas at Carn Ingli and Carn Llidi. Enjoy characterful waterside pubs at Porthgain and Cresswell Quay. Or relax over a quiet cup of coffee or tea and cake at two of Pembrokeshire’s cosiest and most welcoming tea shops and cafés.  Unmissable.    
  • by Dennis Kelsall This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic views and viewpoints along the rugged Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales. For some hillwalkers, the ‘view’ is only achieved on attaining the summit. But here, the endless convolutions of the coastline create an ever changing scene, both in front and behind; with every step shifting the perspective, bringing something different into sight. While the distant view can stretch for miles, inlets, coves and bays may remain hidden, only revealing themselves at the last moment. More immediately, the cliffs are broken by crevices, ledges, caves and natural arches, while just offshore are stacks and wave-washed shoals. Behind, the hinterland is a patchwork of hill, common and agriculture, while the vista out to the sea is endlessly changed by the weather, tide and hour. And, where accessible, the prospect from the beach is different again. Memorable walks to unmissable views.
  •   Enhanced, large scale (1: 25,000) Ordnance Survey mapping in a handy atlas format with all the mapping you need to walk a complete circuit of the Anglesey section of the Wales Coast Path. Continuous OS mapping covering the complete route from Bangor to Porthmadog. Contains coastal extracts from large scale Explorer maps 253 and 254. The Llyn Peninsula Ordnance Survey mapping book is part of a series of map atlases covering the whole of the 870-mile long Wales Coast Path. The enhanced OS 1:25,000 maps are accurate, up-to-date and reliable. Additional map symbols show tea shops, cafes, extra parking, and public toilets. A brief introduction to the Llyn Peninsula includes a fascinating photo mosaic highlighting notable views, places of interest and wildlife you'll meet along the way. There is also a section of detailed Useful Information at the back of the atlas. Laminated flapped covers showing Wales Coast Path signs and waymarkers, route details and map symbols make these atlases simple and easy to use. The map books’ dimensions are 215mm x 107mm and they fit easily into a standard map pocket.
    • Large scale Ordnance Survey Explorer mapping for the complete coast of the Llyn Peninsula in a handy atlas format.
    • Highlighted official route of the Wales Coast Path.
    • On-map symbols showing amenities at main towns and villages.
    • Introduction with attractive photo mosaic.
    • Additional useful information
     
  •   Enhanced, large scale (1: 25,000) Ordnance Survey mapping in a handy atlas format with all the mapping you need to walk a complete circuit of the Anglesey section of the Wales Coast Path. Continuous OS mapping covering the complete circuit from Menai Bridge. Contains coastal extracts from large scale Explorer maps 262 and 263. The Isle of Anglesey/Ynys Mon Ordnance Survey mapping book is part of a series of map atlases covering the whole of the 870-mile long Wales Coast Path. The enhanced OS 1:25,000 maps are accurate, up-to-date and reliable. Additional map symbols show tea shops, cafes, extra parking, and public toilets. A brief introduction to Anglesey includes a fascinating photo mosaic highlighting notable views, places of interest and wildlife you'll meet along the way. There is also a section of detailed Useful Information at the back of the atlas. Laminated flapped covers showing Wales Coast Path signs and waymarkers, route details and map symbols make these atlases simple and easy to use. The map books’ dimensions are 215mm x 107mm and they fit easily into a standard map pocket.
    • Large scale Ordnance Survey Explorer mapping for the complete coast of the Isle of Anglesey/Ynys Mon in a handy atlas format.
    • Highlighted official route of the Wales Coast Path.
    • On-map symbols showing amenities at main towns and villages.
    • Introduction with attractive photo mosaic.
    • Additional useful information
     
  • Coming Soon
       A new addition to the popular Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series, part of the best-selling, UK-wide Top 10 Walks series.  Imagine a pub on the beach or amazing inns by the sea. The Welsh coast boasts some superb seaside pubs overlooking wonderful coasts - from huge sandy bays and intimate coves, to wave-lashed cliffs and dramatic headlands.  This handy, pocket size book takes you to walks to some amazing coastal pubs on the North Wales section of the Wales Coast Path.     
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The Isle of Anglesey offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. In just over 125 miles there are dramatic sea cliffs, quiet coves, wide sandy bays, tiny fishing villages, modern resorts, coastal hills and remains from a rich maritime heritage. The walks in this book are what I consider to be the finest routes along this superb section of coast, one of the seven main sections of the wales Coast Path.  
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. This attractive and cleverly structured guidebook gives walkers the ten best walks on the southern part of the South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path, in a popular pocketable format. With clear information, an overview and introduction for each walk, expertly written numbered directions, Ordnance Survey maps, superb, eye-grabbing panoramic photographs, and interpretation of points of interest along the way, these guides set a new standard in clarity, appeal and ease-of-use. Contents The Wales Coast Path: an introduction Top Ten Walks: Wales Coast Path: North Wales Coast: a photo mosaic
    1. Holywell & Basinwerk Abbey
    2. Talacre & Gronant dunes
    3. Prestatyn to Graig Fawr
    4. Rhyl to Rhuddlan Castle
    5. Little Orme
    6. Around the Great Orme
    7. Conwy Mountain
    8. Above Penmaenmawr
    9. Aber Falls
    10. Lafan Sands - low/high loop
    Useful Information  
  • The ten walks featured here highlight the very best Welsh lighthouses and huge variety of the coastline of Wales. From vast expanses of sand, sea and sky, such as at Whiteford Point and Llanddwyn Island, to rugged coastline where seabirds wheel and skrike and porpoise and seals slide through the waves, like Strumble Head and South Stack, these walks to lighthouses guarantee a fine day out. All are circular, and vary from short and easy, like the to Talacre lighthouse, to longer and more demanding, such as that to St. Ann’s Head lighthouse — but none are beyond any reasonably fit and enthusiastic walker.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Snowdonia & Ceredigion coast offers a tremendous variety of landscape to those who walk its entire 132 miles/213 kilometres: from high, airy cliff-tops to secluded coves; from estuarine salt marshes to beaches backed by tremendous dune system that stretch on for miles. And with that diversity comes a huge range of wildlife, including seabirds, choughs, dolphins and rare wildflowers. The history too changes with every twist and turn of this fascinating route: visitors should always be prepared for the unexpected in a region that contains the ruins of once mighty castles and has links with characters as disparate as King Arthur and members of the rock band Led Zeppelin.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 115 mile/185km long South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path runs through unexpectedly varied and dramatic coastal scenery. Along the way are four National Nature Reserves and some 14 miles of designated Heritage Coast, while the deserted salt marshes and mudflats bordering the later stages of the route alongside the mouth of the River Severn are a bird-watchers' paradise. This Official Guide splits the route into nine achievable day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The past two centuries have wrought more change on South Wales than any other section of the country’s coast. Until the end of the 18th century, Swansea, Barry and even Cardiff were just small ports, though their ships traded far and wide. The industry of iron and coal changed things forever but most of the coast and its immediate hinterland were left unspoiled and elsewhere, nature has reclaimed some of what was taken. The coast is one of extreme contrasts, ranging from great dune systems through sheer cliffs to miles of coastal saltmarsh. Nowhere is far from a delightful stretch overlooking the sea, with fine views, nature and heritage all around.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path New Edition - wholly rewalked and update 2018 The 80 mile/125km long North Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path between Chester and Bangor runs alongside the broad Dee Estuary and traditional seaside towns past Conwy Castle, the Great Orme, Penmaenmawr and Conwy Mountain to the university town of Bangor on the Menai Strait. This Official Guide splits the route into 8 convenient day sections, each of about 9-12 miles / 14-20 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.

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