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  • This Official Guide to the Llŷn Peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path contains everything local and long-distance walkers need. The Llŷn offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. Its distinctive landscape is characterised by traditional farms, compact villages and volcanic hills encircled by the ever-present sea. Along the way, you'll pass Iron Age hillforts, pilgrims' churches, medieval castles, a hidden valley, a pub on the beach, tiny coves, sandy bays and Bardsey island balanced at the tip of this ancient 'Land's End of Wales'. Keep an eye out, too, for seabirds, wild goats, choughs, seals, dolphins, wildflowers and butterflies. The Llŷn coast path really is a walkers' paradise.  
  • This handy little guide book gives you the ten very best short circular walks along the Llŷn peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path The Llŷn pushes 30 miles into the Irish Sea, tipped by the holy isle of Bardsey, or Ynys Enlli ­­— ‘the island of 20,000 saints’. This remote and unspoilt landscape is characterised by traditional farms and compact villages, punctuated by volcanic hills. Its relative isolation has made it a haven for the Welsh language and culture. Sea cliffs, offshore rocks and intimate coves dominate the northern coast, while the gentler southern coast promises sandy beaches and holiday towns like Abersoch and Pwllheli. But for sheer beauty, tranquillity and wildlife, the Llŷn is hard to beat.
  • Walks on the Lleyn Peninsula contains 16 circular walks which explore some of the finest sectoins of the coast, along with several of lleyn’s shapely hills. With distances ranging from 1.5 – 7.25 miles, all walkers are catered for – from those looking for a casual half-day walk to add colour to a hoilday, to the more ambitious who may perhaps complete two or more routes as an alternative to Snowdonia. Understandably popular.
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