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  • Coming Soon
    by Dennis Kelsall This superbly-written and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to the very best stretches of coast, pubs, tea shops, and viewpoints that the beautiful Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales, has to offer. Defining the south-westernmost tip of Wales, Pembrokeshire’s coastline is arguably the most beautiful and varied in the British Isles. Virtually all of it lies within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. Relative isolation has left it largely untouched by modern development and most of its length is a wild frontier where the endless confrontation between sea and land is played out. Long stretches of coast face the fury of Atlantic storms and weakness and faults in the high cliffs are eroded into caves, coves and inlets. However, the harder rock, some of which is 700 million years old, resists the onslaught and stands out in rugged promontories and headlands. Elsewhere, sheltered landings and harbours, fine beaches and secluded bays reveal other aspects of this glorious landscape. In spring and summer the cliff tops break out in the pink, blue, white and yellow of countless flowers and sea crags are alive with nesting birds, while some of Britain’s largest seal populations arrive in autumn to give birth. It was this wild beauty that prompted the establishment of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park in 1952. Despite being one of the UK’s smaller National Parks, it embraces a third of the county including all the offshore islands, the Daugleddau estuary, and the Preseli Hills. The Park is also home to the popular Pembrokeshire Coast Path — now part of the larger Wales Coast Path.  Discover dramatic coastlines at St Davids Head and Strumble Head, Manorbier and Tenby. Climb to lofty coastal panoramas at Carn Ingli and Carn Llidi. Enjoy characterful waterside pubs at Porthgain and Cresswell Quay. Or relax over a quiet cup of coffee or tea and cake at two of Pembrokeshire’s cosiest and most welcoming tea shops and cafés.  Unmissable.    
  • by Dennis Kelsall This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic views and viewpoints along the rugged Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales. For some hillwalkers, the ‘view’ is only achieved on attaining the summit. But here, the endless convolutions of the coastline create an ever changing scene, both in front and behind; with every step shifting the perspective, bringing something different into sight. While the distant view can stretch for miles, inlets, coves and bays may remain hidden, only revealing themselves at the last moment. More immediately, the cliffs are broken by crevices, ledges, caves and natural arches, while just offshore are stacks and wave-washed shoals. Behind, the hinterland is a patchwork of hill, common and agriculture, while the vista out to the sea is endlessly changed by the weather, tide and hour. And, where accessible, the prospect from the beach is different again. Memorable walks to unmissable views.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. This attractive and cleverly structured guidebook gives walkers the ten best walks on the southern part of the South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path, in a popular pocketable format. With clear information, an overview and introduction for each walk, expertly written numbered directions, Ordnance Survey maps, superb, eye-grabbing panoramic photographs, and interpretation of points of interest along the way, these guides set a new standard in clarity, appeal and ease-of-use. Contents The Wales Coast Path: an introduction Top Ten Walks: Wales Coast Path: North Wales Coast: a photo mosaic
    1. Holywell & Basinwerk Abbey
    2. Talacre & Gronant dunes
    3. Prestatyn to Graig Fawr
    4. Rhyl to Rhuddlan Castle
    5. Little Orme
    6. Around the Great Orme
    7. Conwy Mountain
    8. Above Penmaenmawr
    9. Aber Falls
    10. Lafan Sands - low/high loop
    Useful Information  
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Snowdonia & Ceredigion coast offers a tremendous variety of landscape to those who walk its entire 132 miles/213 kilometres: from high, airy cliff-tops to secluded coves; from estuarine salt marshes to beaches backed by tremendous dune system that stretch on for miles. And with that diversity comes a huge range of wildlife, including seabirds, choughs, dolphins and rare wildflowers. The history too changes with every twist and turn of this fascinating route: visitors should always be prepared for the unexpected in a region that contains the ruins of once mighty castles and has links with characters as disparate as King Arthur and members of the rock band Led Zeppelin.
  • Pembrokeshire’s Café Culture is booming and it’s not the big chains leading the way. Gone are the steamy fugs, greasy-spoon menus and chipped mugs; instead, there’s no shortage of bright and friendly venues serving speciality coffees and teas, home-made baking, and wonderful snacks and meals that capitalise on the best of local produce and culinary talent. Very often there’re take-away options too and sometimes interesting wines or Welsh-brewed beers and ciders. Many are open all day from breakfast and morning coffee to afternoon tea, with some venues running into the evening too with live music, poetry or storytelling. They’re great places to rest or meet up with friends, too; so go for a walk and see what you can find — you’ll not be disappointed.
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path New Edition - wholly rewalked and update 2018 The 80 mile/125km long North Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path between Chester and Bangor runs alongside the broad Dee Estuary and traditional seaside towns past Conwy Castle, the Great Orme, Penmaenmawr and Conwy Mountain to the university town of Bangor on the Menai Strait. This Official Guide splits the route into 8 convenient day sections, each of about 9-12 miles / 14-20 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • The Official Guide to the Isle of Anglesey/Ynys Mon Coastal Path New Edition - rewalked and wholly updated 2018 The route is described in a clockwise direction, starting and finishing at Holyhead. The 130 mile/210km long Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path passes through some of the grandest coastal scenery in Wales — wide sandy bays and estuaries, intimate coves, dramatic cliffs and rocky islets, sand dunes and forests—much of it designated ‘An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). This Official Guide has been designed to provide all the information needed to plan and walk the coastal path and includes:
    • Information on accommodation, public transport, seasonal closures and tidal restrictions
    • Twelve day-walk chapter sections with detailed route descriptions and full Ordnance Survey mapping
    • Fascinating notes on points of interest
  • Coming Soon
    One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 186 mile/300km long Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path runs through some of Wales’ most varied and dramatic coastal scenery — high, rugged cliffs and long sandy bays, Pembroke Castle, St David’s cathedral and St Govan’s remote cliff-wrapped chapel, with several large offshore islands. Pembrokeshire is also Britain’s only coastal National Park. This Official Guide splits the route into 14 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on ten of the best short circular walks along the Ceredigion coast. Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey Island on the tip of the Llŷn in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties: Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The southern half of Cardigan Bay covers the rugged coastline between Aberystwyth and Cardigan. The dramatic cliffs and hidden coves are part of the Ceredigion Coast Path: a 60 mile trail that promises stunning views and some of the best opportunities for walkers to spot maritime wildlife in Wales.
  • This handy little guide book gives you the ten very best short circular walks along the Llŷn peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path The Llŷn pushes 30 miles into the Irish Sea, tipped by the holy isle of Bardsey, or Ynys Enlli ­­— ‘the island of 20,000 saints’. This remote and unspoilt landscape is characterised by traditional farms and compact villages, punctuated by volcanic hills. Its relative isolation has made it a haven for the Welsh language and culture. Sea cliffs, offshore rocks and intimate coves dominate the northern coast, while the gentler southern coast promises sandy beaches and holiday towns like Abersoch and Pwllheli. But for sheer beauty, tranquillity and wildlife, the Llŷn is hard to beat.
  • Coastal Walks around Anglesey contains 22 easy, circular walks that sample just about everything the island’s coastline has to offer. The routes have been chosen with all walkers in mind – from those looking for a casual half-day walk to add variety to a holiday, to the more ambitious who may complete two or more routes, perhaps as a less strenuous alternative to Snowdonia.
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