• by Dennis Kelsall This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic views and viewpoints along the rugged Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales. For some hillwalkers, the ‘view’ is only achieved on attaining the summit. But here, the endless convolutions of the coastline create an ever changing scene, both in front and behind; with every step shifting the perspective, bringing something different into sight. While the distant view can stretch for miles, inlets, coves and bays may remain hidden, only revealing themselves at the last moment. More immediately, the cliffs are broken by crevices, ledges, caves and natural arches, while just offshore are stacks and wave-washed shoals. Behind, the hinterland is a patchwork of hill, common and agriculture, while the vista out to the sea is endlessly changed by the weather, tide and hour. And, where accessible, the prospect from the beach is different again. Memorable walks to unmissable views.
  • by Dennis Kelsall This superbly-written and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to the very best stretches of coast, pubs, tea shops, and viewpoints that the beautiful Pembrokeshire coast, in West Wales, has to offer. Defining the south-westernmost tip of Wales, Pembrokeshire’s coastline is arguably the most beautiful and varied in the British Isles. Virtually all of it lies within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. Relative isolation has left it largely untouched by modern development and most of its length is a wild frontier where the endless confrontation between sea and land is played out. Long stretches of coast face the fury of Atlantic storms and weakness and faults in the high cliffs are eroded into caves, coves and inlets. However, the harder rock, some of which is 700 million years old, resists the onslaught and stands out in rugged promontories and headlands. Elsewhere, sheltered landings and harbours, fine beaches and secluded bays reveal other aspects of this glorious landscape. In spring and summer the cliff tops break out in the pink, blue, white and yellow of countless flowers and sea crags are alive with nesting birds, while some of Britain’s largest seal populations arrive in autumn to give birth. It was this wild beauty that prompted the establishment of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park in 1952. Despite being one of the UK’s smaller National Parks, it embraces a third of the county including all the offshore islands, the Daugleddau estuary, and the Preseli Hills. The Park is also home to the popular Pembrokeshire Coast Path — now part of the larger Wales Coast Path.  Discover dramatic coastlines at St Davids Head and Strumble Head, Manorbier and Tenby. Climb to lofty coastal panoramas at Carn Ingli and Carn Llidi. Enjoy characterful waterside pubs at Porthgain and Cresswell Quay. Or relax over a quiet cup of coffee or tea and cake at two of Pembrokeshire’s cosiest and most welcoming tea shops and cafés.  Unmissable.    

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