Wales Coast Path: Short Circular Walks

/Wales Coast Path: Short Circular Walks
  • Top 10 Walks: wales Coast Path: Ceredigion and Cardigan Bay North
    This lovely little book contains the ten best short circular walks along the north part of the Cardigan Bay section of the Wales Coast Path Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey island on the tip of Lleyn, in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire, in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties, Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The striking northern section between Porthmadog and Borth is as varied as it is beautiful. Characterised by vast beaches and rugged cliffs, the coast offers superb walking with ever-changing views and a wealth of wildlife.
  • This handy little guide book gives you the ten very best short circular walks along the Llŷn peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path The Llŷn pushes 30 miles into the Irish Sea, tipped by the holy isle of Bardsey, or Ynys Enlli ­­— ‘the island of 20,000 saints’. This remote and unspoilt landscape is characterised by traditional farms and compact villages, punctuated by volcanic hills. Its relative isolation has made it a haven for the Welsh language and culture. Sea cliffs, offshore rocks and intimate coves dominate the northern coast, while the gentler southern coast promises sandy beaches and holiday towns like Abersoch and Pwllheli. But for sheer beauty, tranquillity and wildlife, the Llŷn is hard to beat.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on ten of the best short circular walks along the Ceredigion coast. Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey Island on the tip of the Llŷn in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties: Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The southern half of Cardigan Bay covers the rugged coastline between Aberystwyth and Cardigan. The dramatic cliffs and hidden coves are part of the Ceredigion Coast Path: a 60 mile trail that promises stunning views and some of the best opportunities for walkers to spot maritime wildlife in Wales.
  • This lovely little book explores the ten best short circular walks along the southern part of the Pembrokeshire coast — itself part of the Wales Coast Path. The Pembrokeshire coast alters subtly from north to south. The southern rocks are far younger and the coast tends to be south-facing, too, creating a gentler hinterland. This influenced historical development and culture, for although the Norman advance extended throughout Pembrokeshire, settlement focused on the more fertile southern corner. It became known as ‘Little England’, with English rather than Welsh spoken, a tradition reflected in place names. Before reliable roads, trade and prosperity favoured the coast, and because the railways came late here, Pembrokeshire was largely ignored by the Industrial Revolution. Unspoiled and breathtakingly scenic, the coast is captivating every step of the way.
  • This photogenic book will take you on ten short circular walks along the northern part of the Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path. Pembrokeshire’s north coast has a rugged and remote quality, reflecting the wildness of the hills that rise behind. It was largely ignored during the Norman colonisation and even today beyond St Dogmael’s there are only a handful of coastal communities. Yet burial cairns, promontory forts and a pre-historic trackway across the Preseli Hills indicate widespread prehistoric settlement, and it was an important focus during the spread of Celtic Christianity. Fishing, farming and stock grazing were traditional ways of life, but the Industrial Revolution briefly opened coastal quarrying and the railway made Fishguard an important Irish port. Today, it is a relative backwater but the coast has an untamed beauty, its flowers, birds, seals and porpoises making it a truly special place.
  • This handy, pocket size book will take you on the ten best short circular walks along the Carmarthen Bay and Gower stretch of the Wales Coast Path. Carmarthen Bay embraces an area of Welsh coast stretching from south Pembrokeshire to the Gower Peninsula. Long, sandy beaches and wide, silty estuaries dominate much of the bay, though there are also high cliffs and rocky coves in places. The Gower Peninsula, at the eastern end of the bay, is a small but priceless gem. Britain’s first official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), the peninsula contains an astonishing variety of landscapes: dunes, marshland, high cliffs, windswept downs, wooded valleys, picturesque villages and glorious sandy beaches — all linked by a superb footpath network.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The past two centuries have wrought more change on South Wales than any other section of the country’s coast. Until the end of the 18th century, Swansea, Barry and even Cardiff were just small ports, though their ships traded far and wide. The industry of iron and coal changed things forever but most of the coast and its immediate hinterland were left unspoiled and elsewhere, nature has reclaimed some of what was taken. The coast is one of extreme contrasts, ranging from great dune systems through sheer cliffs to miles of coastal saltmarsh. Nowhere is far from a delightful stretch overlooking the sea, with fine views, nature and heritage all around.
  • Pembrokeshire’s Café Culture is booming and it’s not the big chains leading the way. Gone are the steamy fugs, greasy-spoon menus and chipped mugs; instead, there’s no shortage of bright and friendly venues serving speciality coffees and teas, home-made baking, and wonderful snacks and meals that capitalise on the best of local produce and culinary talent. Very often there’re take-away options too and sometimes interesting wines or Welsh-brewed beers and ciders. Many are open all day from breakfast and morning coffee to afternoon tea, with some venues running into the evening too with live music, poetry or storytelling. They’re great places to rest or meet up with friends, too; so go for a walk and see what you can find — you’ll not be disappointed.
  • The ten walks featured here highlight the very best Welsh lighthouses and huge variety of the coastline of Wales. From vast expanses of sand, sea and sky, such as at Whiteford Point and Llanddwyn Island, to rugged coastline where seabirds wheel and skrike and porpoise and seals slide through the waves, like Strumble Head and South Stack, these walks to lighthouses guarantee a fine day out. All are circular, and vary from short and easy, like the to Talacre lighthouse, to longer and more demanding, such as that to St. Ann’s Head lighthouse — but none are beyond any reasonably fit and enthusiastic walker.
  • Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path: North Wales Coast
    Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. This attractive and cleverly structured guidebook gives walkers the ten best walks on the southern part of the South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path, in a popular pocketable format. With clear information, an overview and introduction for each walk, expertly written numbered directions, Ordnance Survey maps, superb, eye-grabbing panoramic photographs, and interpretation of points of interest along the way, these guides set a new standard in clarity, appeal and ease-of-use. Contents The Wales Coast Path: an introduction Top Ten Walks: Wales Coast Path: North Wales Coast: a photo mosaic
    1. Holywell & Basinwerk Abbey
    2. Talacre & Gronant dunes
    3. Prestatyn to Graig Fawr
    4. Rhyl to Rhuddlan Castle
    5. Little Orme
    6. Around the Great Orme
    7. Conwy Mountain
    8. Above Penmaenmawr
    9. Aber Falls
    10. Lafan Sands - low/high loop
    Useful Information  
  • Newborough Forest and Llanddwyn Island walk
    Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The Isle of Anglesey offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. In just over 125 miles there are dramatic sea cliffs, quiet coves, wide sandy bays, tiny fishing villages, modern resorts, coastal hills and remains from a rich maritime heritage. The walks in this book are what I consider to be the finest routes along this superb section of coast, one of the seven main sections of the wales Coast Path.